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SILO Seminar Series: Aswin Sankaranarayanan

Event Details

When: April 12, 2017, 12:30 PM

Location: 3rd Floor Orchard View Room , Discovery Building

Contact: 608-316-4401, hstampfli@wisc.edu

Aswin Sankaranarayanan

Aswin Sankaranarayanan

Computational Imaging – Breaking the limitations of conventional imaging designs

Abstract: The basic design of the camera — a lens and an imaging sensor — has remain unchanged for many centuries. While this design has been perfected for professional photography, there are many current and upcoming application domains where it is woefully inadequate. I will discuss three such examples: high-resolution imaging in infrared, extremely thin form-factor cameras, and post-process freedom. In each example, I will discuss research from my work on novel imaging designs and associated image processing techniques that provide capabilities that far exceed those of the conventional design. Central to the talk is the idea of computational imaging, the co-design of optics and processing to break the limitations of conventional imaging designs.

Bio: Aswin Sankaranarayanan is an Assistant Professor at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). He earned his Ph.D. from University of Maryland, College Park where he was awarded the distinguished dissertation fellowship for his thesis work by the ECE department in 2009. He was a post-doctoral researcher at the DSP group at Rice University before joining the faculty at the ECE Department at CMU in 2013. Aswin is the PI of the Image Science Lab at CMU, whose research spans topics in imaging, machine vision, and image processing.

SILO is a lecture series with speakers from the UW faculty, graduate students or invited researchers that discuss mathematical related topics. The seminars are organized by WID’s Optimization research group and sponsored by generous support of the Advance Technology Group of the 3M Company and the Analytics Group of Northwestern Mutual.
SILO’s purpose is to provide a forum that helps connect and recruit mathematically-minded graduate students. SILO is a lunch-and-listen format, where speakers present interesting math topics while the audience eats lunch.