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When Photographers are Neuroscientists

We're reading about the work of artists like Elena Dorfman, who blend ideas of perception into one art form. By purposefully exposing her photos to transmit physical impossibilities or contradicting points of view, Dorfman bends the rules on what the eyes see and the brain processes.

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Photography and neuroscience – two topics that seem to have little in common, but both depend fundamentally on perception. For photographers, the goal is to transmit a natural perception of a scene to someone who is not there. For neuroscientists, perception relies on the ability for humans to fill in the gaps based on experience and, in some cases, their imaginations. The improvisation created by the brain makes up for “blind spots,” creating an individual, unique understanding of the surrounding world.

We’re reading about the work of artists like Elena Dorfman, who blend these two ideas of perception into one art form. By purposefully exposing her photos to transmit physical impossibilities or contradicting points of view, Dorfman bends the rules on what the eyes see and the brain processes.

Read the article “When Photographers are Neuroscientists” via Nautilus.

 


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