Tiny Capsules Packed with Gene-Editing Tools Offer Alternative to Viral Delivery of Gene Therapy

An interdisciplinary pair of WID researchers has developed a new nanocapsule delivery method for delivering the CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing tool. The new system could be used for many types of gene therapies.

Claudia Solís-Lemus

Assistant Professor

  • WID Faculty

My research involves the development of statistical models to answer biological questions.

Ryan Herringa

Ryan Herringa

Associate Professor

  • Discovery Fellow

Neurodevelopmental mechanisms of stress and mental illness in youth

Amulya Suresh

Amulya Suresh

  • Undergraduate Student

CRISPR-Cas9 Strategy to Generate DOT1L-Deficient Embryonic Stem Cells to Study Pluripotency

WID Hubs Launch at Illuminating Connections Event

WID’s new hubs—Data Science, Multi-Omics, and Illuminating Discovery—represent a new path forward for collaborative research projects and fields.

New Technology for Controlling Neural Tissue Manufacturing

A paper published in eLife this week by an interdisciplinary team at WID describes new methods for reproducibly manufacturing brain and spinal cord organoids with strict control over morphogenic and developmental processes.

Micah Dombroe

Micah Dombroe

Lab Manager

  • Research Staff

Genomic DNA sequencing and viral production. Facilitate various administrative functions.

Min Zhu

MIn Zhu

  • Graduate Student

Nanoparticles for delivery of therapeutic agents and with gene-editing

Ryan Aturaliya

Ryan Aturaliya

  • Undergraduate Student

Treating ePTFE grafts to mimic the characteristics of human blood vessels.

Jo Handelsman

WID Director

  • WID Faculty

Genetic and biochemical processes underlying interactions within plant and human microbiomes.

Randolph Ashton Continues Research into Causes of Lou Gehrig’s Disease

In August 2017, Randolph Ashton received almost $800,000 from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, part of NIH, to continue a five-year research study of Lou Gehrig’s disease (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS), after successfully completing its first phase.

UW-Madison to be Partner in Center for Cell Manufacturing Technologies

The National Science Foundation has awarded nearly $20 million to a consortium of universities to support a new engineering research center that will develop transformative tools and technologies for the consistent, scalable, and low-cost production of high-quality living therapeutic cells. Several WID investigators are collaborators on the project.