UW-Madison to be Partner in Center for Cell Manufacturing Technologies

The National Science Foundation has awarded nearly $20 million to a consortium of universities to support a new engineering research center that will develop transformative tools and technologies for the consistent, scalable, and low-cost production of high-quality living therapeutic cells. Several WID investigators are collaborators on the project.

Handelsman Lab

Understanding diversity in microbial communities and their role in infectious disease; in particular, the genetic basis for stability of microbial communities, the role of a gut community as a source of opportunistic pathogens, and the soil microbial community as a source of new antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes.

Yin Research Group

Investigating how living organisms cooperate or compete in diverse and changing environments. Methods and perspectives are drawn from many fields, including ecology, evolution, molecular biology, physics, chemistry, engineering, mathematics, and computer science. The lab uses data-driven mechanistic and statistical models to predict when microbes or other organisms will persist or perish, with a broad goal of promoting human health through effective management of microbe-host interactions.

Gong Lab

Prof. Gong’s research group focuses on the design, synthesis/fabrication, and characterization of novel materials and devices. Many of their ongoing projects are multidisciplinary, bridging engineering with materials science, chemistry, and life sciences. Some of their efforts include multifunctional drug/agent nanocarriers for the combined delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents which can be used to treat and diagnose various types of diseases. Her group also studies multifunctional polymer nanocomposites for various applications including flexible electronics, supercapacitors, and nanogenerators.

Ashton Group: Stem Cell Bioprocessing and Regenerative Biomaterials Lab

The Ashton Group is working to understand, model, and recapitulate in vitro the instructive signals utilized by human embryos to pattern tissue-specific differentiation of pluripotent stem cells, and apply this knowledge towards the rational design of tissue engineered scaffolds and other regenerative therapeutic strategies.