WID100

The future of scientific discovery is interdisciplinary. The first 100 members of our community to support the innovative, interdisciplinary science happening every day at WID with donations of $1,000 or more will become charter members of the WID100.

WID Symposium

August 27, 2020 The Third Annual WID Symposium — and first virtual WID Symposium — features lightning talks, a poster session, and community building for WIDites. This event is integral to being a WIDite, so please make your attendance a top priority and encourage your colleagues to do the same. …

Kohler Fellows Talk “Facts” on WORT Access Hour

Three members of the Kohler Fellows met and prerecorded a spontaneous and animated discussion of the concept of “facts.”  They were biochemist and geneticist Ana Lindahl, English literature student Julie Dauer, and neuroscience-and-public policy student Andrew Merluzzi. The recording took place live in the WORT studios on Wednesday, December 7th.

Communication and Policy the Focus of Two Science Festival Events

WID Director Jo Handelsman and the Catalysts for Science Policy were instrumental in assembling fantastic panels for mini-symposia about science policy and science communication geared toward graduate students, postdocs, and faculty but open to anyone interested in science.

Discovery Fellows

WID unites creative minds focused on scientific projects and ideas by generating novel combinations of academics and collaborations. The Discovery Fellows program seeks to establish research collaborations with faculty of exceptional ability in order to expand the scope of research and promote WID’s core vision and mission.

Labs

Researchers at WID have their own in-depth, innovative, rigorous research programs in addition to their contributions to WID initiatives, involvement in Discovery Hubs, and commitment to WID’s collaborative culture.

Nolan Lendved

Nolan Lendved

Director of Communications

  • Administrative Staff

Telling WID's story through articles, events, and social media.

Support

The Wisconsin Institute for Discovery is looking for new partners to support its unique approach to interdisciplinary research. By giving $1,000 or more today to the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery Fund, you can become a founding member of the WID100.

Stories

The important work done in WID’s collaborative network does not end with publication in scientific journals. A key part of WID’s mission is to share our discoveries with our community and the world — here, we tell the story of our unique approach to scientific inquiry, our connections on campus and …

Kohler Fellows

Marie Christine Kohler Fellows at WID (“Kohler Fellows” for short) are senior graduate or professional students selected on the strength of their commitment and abilities to contribute to transdisciplinary thought. Kohler Fellows work and collaborate in the Institute, connecting graduate students across campus through a range of stimulating events.

FAQ

What is WID? The Wisconsin Institute for Discovery is a research institute on the campus of the University of Wisconsin-Madison that was built to develop a new approach to science driven by unlikely collaborations among outstanding research minds. Strengths in complex systems, data science, emerging technologies, and precision medicine enable …

Discovery Partnership

A Research Center under the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Education, WID is located in the award-winning Discovery Building along with its partners the private, non-profit Morgridge Institute for Research and the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF). This public-private partnership conducts research, engages with the community and celebrates science. …

Catalysts for Science Policy

Catalysts for Science Policy (CaSP) (1) educate graduate students about science policy and emphasize the importance of increasing scientist participation in science policy issues, both local and national, (2) increase graduate student awareness of various science policy careers and provide opportunities to help them become better candidates for these positions, and (3) communicate relevant science topics to government and funding agencies, and to the non-scientist community in Madison.